Gives a meal Stephanie-appeal

Thursday, June 01, 2006

A final-study done by Stephanie

"Nude, Nude, and Nude: A look into the world of a male dominated and a female dominated magazine."

Two-sentence summary of findings:
This study has shown men in a more demure and sophisticated manner that portrays them as strong, powerful and always making eye contact, while women were depicted as vacant and no contact with the audience. Women are easily suggestive with buttons loosened and men are active, playing a sport, in the photograph.
Summary of the previous study:
The previous studies like Kolber, R. and Albanese, P. (“Man to man: A content analysis of sole-male images in male-audience magazines.” Winter96, Journal of Advertising) depicted men as consuming a traditional role in male oriented magazines. This “traditional man” has great upper-body strength and muscular. Their dress is demure and hair cut is conservative conveying a good lifestyle. Another study performed by Carpenter, C. and Edison A. (“Taking It off All over Again: The Portrayal of Women in Advertising over the Past Forty Years.” 2005, Conference Papers-International Communication Association) indicates that women are portrayed as sexual objects more so than men. Women were also more likely to be shown in a more decorative manner than men.
Its most important foundation literature and how it relates to your own project: The significant studies used by the previous study are the works of Soley, L. and Reid, L. (“Taking it off: Are models in magazine ads wearing less?” 1988, Journalism Quarterly) and Reichert T., Lambiase, J., Morgan, S., Carstarphen, M., and Zavoina, S. (“Cheesecake and beefcake: No matter how you slice it, sexual explicitness in advertising continues to increase.” 1999, Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly), which concludes that the level of sexuality in advertising is growing. It’s becoming more explicit and more diverse throughout time. Other studies like from Bly, Robert (“Iron John: A Book about Men”, Reading, 1990, MA: Addison-Wesley), Goffman, Erving (“Gender Advertisements,” Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1979) and Kimmel, Michael, (“Manhood in America,” New York: The Free Press, 1996) express the individualism and characteristics that men contain in life. This expression can be looked through magazine advertisements as I did in my study.
Corpus and method:
Some questions that I’ve wondered about were,
RQ1: Has the level of dress changed for males and females in magazines?
RQ2: Do men appear more confident than women in print ads?
RQ3: Are women still seen as sexual objects and are men being objectified as well?My corpus consists of a random selection of 20 full-page, color ads in two magazines. The magazines that I picked are typically known to be either male oriented or female oriented. The magazines that I looked at were the June 2006 issue of Men’s Health and the June 2006 issue of Elle. The method used in my research is quantitative content analysis. All characters in the magazine ads were coded through categories such as woman to man ratio, dress, facial expression, eye contact, posture and hand placement.
Findings:
Starting with Elle Magazine, out of the 20 random ads, the ratio of women to men was 18:5. For a female oriented magazine, it makes sense to show more women than men. Over 60% of the women were in the group of suggestive, partially clad or nude. An interesting observation was that a majority of women were photographed with their mouth slightly open in a very suggestive manner. Another thing I noticed was eye contact. Women didn’t have eye contact with the camera, as if they were vacant and not in this world. A lot of the women were laying down also in a suggestive manner. Using hand placement was a very remarkable examination because around 40% of the women had their hand suggestively combing their hair or touching their face. The one ad that caught my attention was for jewelry, in which a beautiful, blonde woman who poses an innocent facade by placing her fingers around her mouth. Her sexiness is selling the jewelry right off her fingers. The posture was equally balanced with women either standing up or laying down.
In the Men’s Health magazine, the woman to man ratio resulted to 8:18, respectively. In which I thought was very interesting, because I thought that that magazine would’ve more photographs of women. The shocker of this study is that in one of the ads with a woman in it, it was actually an African American woman selling for Lipton Tea. That is amazing news because out of the 20 ads from Elle, none of them were African American. Another ad that I looked at was for St. Pauli Girl beer because the woman wasn’t even real in the ad. Her body was made out of the beer and her hair was the foam. So, I’m assuming that men only want to drink beer and not thinking about women, just staring at their outline of the body. Going back to Men’s Health, over half of the people shown in this magazine were dressed demurely. The people that were either partially clad or nude were typically the women in the magazine. As for eye contact, men had more eye contact than women in these magazines. They held such a strong and stern face, looking directly into the camera. The men weren’t smiling and portrayed a more serious manner. Another characteristic that I noticed was their active roles. The men weren’t posing for just another picture, they were actually doing activities such as playing cards, riding bikes and playing tennis. Some of the men are objectified, but maybe it’s justifiable because the products they’re selling were workout equipment.
Conclusions:
While Elle Magazine looks like its moving towards a good direction and trying to show women dressed more demurely, around 40%, the magazine shows photographs that still want to sex it up by having the woman’s mouth slightly open and having her caress her body and hair. It also makes a difference when the Elle magazine, on the cover, exclaims that it’s “The Body Issue” and that’s why there were more depiction of women in the nude or partially clad. It would be interesting to follow this study throughout the year, because I think the summer issues show more skin than the other winter, spring and fall issues. I also wonder if the products in these advertisements get frequently sold or not. Women still seem like sexual objects because of the poses and the vacant look and no eye contact with the camera, while men maintain a serious and masculine face. Yes, some of the photos make men look like the sexual objects, but it’s more common to find a woman in that position. We’re still accepting our traditional roles in print advertising, the man is the provider, dresses to success and more active; the woman is laying down, acting innocent, and exuding sex. Another continuation of this study would be to read the covers of the magazines and see the similarities of the print. A message to all men, you will never find a real woman that has the innocence of a school girl and the bad girl from the bedroom. The word sex does sell. Just doing a google search for “sex in magazines” has over 40 million hits and surprise, Cosmopolitan is within the first ten sites.

Elle

Male
5
Female
18


Dress

Demure
9
Part. Clad
7
Suggestive
3
Nude
4

Female
Eye contact
6
No eye contact
12



Female
Hand & head
8
Hand & mouth
1
Mouth slight open
8


Men's Health

Male
18
Female
8


Dress

Demure
15
Part. Clad
4
Suggestive
3
Nude
4

Male
Eye contact
12
No eye contact
6


Active roles
10

Women posts to look at
Megan Rouse (TV): http://meganr-megan.blogspot.com/
Heather Martin (Movies): http://hmm0013.blogspot.com/

BAM-BOOZ-LED

WOW! What can you say about that movie today?
I don't even know where to start. I can understand why Damon Wayans chooses not to speak of the movie. That has got to be a hard role to play and I don't think I would have gotten the strength to do it. It's hard to admit, but I did start crying when Womack and Manray start putting blackface on and you could see the beginning of a tear in Womack's eye. Oh, that got me.


IMDb actually gave this movie, 6.3 out of 10 stars.

http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/bamboozled/

This quote sums up how I feel about this movie:
"Its shelf life may not be long, nor will it probably be a big hit, since the laughter it provokes is the kind that makes you swirm. But that's what good satire is supposed to do."
-Stephen Holden, NEW YORK TIMES

http://www.awesomefilm.com/script/Bamboozled.txt
Wow, this movie has some impact on people. They have the whole script out.

Hear me Roar

This class makes me feel like I should turn into a feminist because of all the sexism in the media today. I still can't get over the fact that men in the advertising world make more money than women. That's stupid. I think that will be the true change and revolution: when women will make the same amount of money as men. What a concept?! Men and women being equal. Next, it'll be that I, a Hispanic woman, will have the same opportunity as a white woman. I can't even imagine.
Do you want to know why I love watching Gilmore Girls? Because the main characters, Lorelai and Rory are both dominate females. They have goals and ambitions and wit. You really don't find that in many shows now. Usually, the mother is submissive to the husband and the son is going to college, but the daughter is off shopping and doing girlie things. But Gilmore Girls doesn't have a strong father figure or strong male influences. I think that's why I liked Roseanne growing up, because she was the dominate character on the show. She made the orders and carried them through. Sure, it seemed like she had an equal marriage, but truth be told, Dan, didn't do much of the dominating things.
Maybe that's the reason why I have a hard time keeping a long relationship, because I want to make the rules and keep order. I don't want to follow what a man tells me. I had a hard time listening because of this. Plus, there is probably some left over resentment towards my father.

UNITED.

Gay and Lesbians.
In the 1970's, It was assumed that gay people were the invisible. I mean, people like Archie couldn't even say the word...GAY. I always wondered that if America is considered this great
melting pot, why do we still have these separations of race, gender and personal interests.
Even in the 80's, when men were gay, one was wearing a business suit and one was wearing
normal casual wear. I guess, I just thought that was interesting. Now, the depictions of gay people and lesbians are overwhelming. The networks esp. MTV love showing the same sex kissing each other. My memory is kind of shady, but didn't Ellen have a show and when she announced that she was gay, the show stopped producing more episodes.
Still, to this day, a lot of gay people feel like they have to closet it and act "normal". My best
friend in high school was a lesbian and didn't come out until college, but I'd never hold anything against her. She was a great person and just because she preferred women rather than men didn't make you any less of a person. Shoot...Somedays I prefer the company of women rather than my boyfriend.

Some disturbing ads

So, since my project pertains to looking at ads in Elle and Men's Health magazines, two ads really stuck out. The first one that was located inside the back cover in the Elle magazine. It was for Evian detox and it pictured a woman stretched out on a mountain top completely nude. She had white snow covering her breasts and it looks like she is making asnow angel. But, do you really need a naked woman to sell water?
Another one is in the Men's Health closer to the back for erotic pleasures video series. So, in the picture, they show the woman completely nude and sitting on top of the man. You can barely see the man's body, but the woman has to strategic move her hands so she can cover her body. I just thought that this ad was out of place. This isn't an "adult" magazine, anyone can pick this up.

Tuesday, May 30, 2006

One more rant about MTV

I really don't know why I watch MTV. I think I still believe that I love music so much that they'd play it all the time. But, the bombardment of TV reality shows is the real truth and the music videos actually only play in the midnight hours and early morning, when people are asleep. The programs are very different towards their female audience and their male audience. For example, they show programs like 8th & Ocean (modeling), Tiara Girls (pageants), and Laguna Beach (high school drama) shows for the female audience. For male, Call to Greatness (active, record breakers), Jackass (guys doing stupid things), and Yo Momma (insult comedy). So, MTV thinks that women only want to watch programs to try and improve themselves and look pretty. And men play a more active role and doing things that will get them in trouble and on TV. :(
Now, they are starting to go to different beaches because of summer break. Everyday is a wild party, girls half naked, boys looking and trying to score. They have different hot body contests. I remember, one female audience member, it's her 21st birthday and she said she was going to get so drunk and get naked.
MTV use to be so good. I wonder what happened. They got lost in the whole reality kick and didn't look back.

Half asleep

So, I was half asleep and half awake. Laying on the couch. The TV was on MTV and I caught a little bit. The girl on the screen was black and lived in a state that was predominately white. She's lived there her whole life and the only thing she wanted to do was change the color of her skin. I don't think anyone talked to her. Her skin was pretty light, but people still knew she was African American. She said when she was in middle high, I believe, that she tried bleaching her skin.
here:

"23-year-old Tiffany grew up Honey Brooke, Pennsylvania as the only black member of an all-white family. She has been ashamed of her race her entire life, and is constantly bleaching her skin and straightening her hair in order to appear more Caucasian. Desperate to find some sort of identity outside of the predominantly white community of Honey Brooke, Tiffany searches online to try to find other black girls nearby. Tiffany eventually decides to stop trying to change her appearance, and starts to seek professional counseling."
-mtv.com/truelife


I wasn't dreaming it, but I wish I did because this type of thing makes me really sad. Bleaching her skin. I can't even imagine the effects that has on someone. i am so glad she's seeking help. I didn't get to watch the whole thing, but I wonder if any one tried to befriend her at her schools, walking down the street, or anything. Is our world that unfriendly to make people feel like they have to change themselves to please others?

Sunday, May 28, 2006

Possible final project idea

Thinking that this will be a lot more workload than the first one, I think I want to look into the different depictions that magazines have on men and women. And see how they differ by using different media like television and movies. I already have a prediction on how this will go. In movies, I think the woman has a more submissive role and the man has a provider role. On television, women will be more catty and verbally aggressive and men will be more knowledgeable and funnier. And in magazines, women will be seen as sexual objects/ beings and men will be sophisticated and classy.
I really also liked the Disney movie idea about looking into the movies with the princesses. They produced movies with such characters as Jasmine, Cinderella, Mulan, Ariel, Sleeping Beauty, Belle, Snow White, etc. But where is an African American or hispanic princess. That is weird to me.

The hardest thing about this project is looking for the research prior to the study. What if there is a subject that no one has ever dissected and I thought it was a good idea? That's the pickle I'm in. So, I'm taking over this memorial day weekend and doing lots of research to see what I come up with. Hoping for success.

Thursday, May 25, 2006

¿qué usted está pensando?

Being a latina, hispanic depiction in movie roles burns me up. Ok, this might sound weird and I don't believe this way, but I grew up being taught about the differences of latinos. My dad is from South America, so he considers himself a hispanic man. He and some others think that there are distinct classes among the same group. For example, they believe that mexicans are of lower class. It's weird, but the movies that were shown in the past, just sparked my interest in it. I've caught myself making a stereotypical joke about mexicans. Just hanging around my friends, they either quote shows like Family Guy and Simpsons that have a lot of stereotypes, or they just tell stories about people and use stereotypical roles for those characters that they are describing.

Wednesday, May 24, 2006

A mini study done by Stephanie

http://search.looksmart.com/p/articles/mi_m2294/is_51/ai_n8694424?pi=ls

"Peanuts, peanuts, get your peanuts here: A look inside stereotypes in daily newspaper comics."

Two-sentence summary of findings:
Men, in comic strips in a daily newspaper, are shown as dominant providers of the household, while women are depicted as vacant, silent and played passive roles. Even though a majority of the bylines consisted of males, minorities are underrepresented and careless.

Summary of the previous study:
The previous study by Glascock, Preston-Schreck (“Gender and Racial Stereotypes in daily newspaper comics: a time-honored tradition?” Oct. 2004, Sex Roles: A Journal of Research) revealed that the main contributors of writers and cartoonists were men. The major characters were overweight, working men, rather than women. Female characters were more likely to be verbally aggressive, involved in child care and depicted as supportive thin wives. In this study of the daily newspaper, African Americans and other minorities accounted for less than five percent of the characters and less likely to be identified with an occupation.

Its most important foundation literature and how it relates to your own project:
The significant studies used by the previous study are the works of Brabant, S., & Mooney, L. (“Sex role stereotyping in the Sunday comics: Ten years later.” 1986, Sex Roles), whom examined Sunday comic strips over a six-month period that concluded women playing “the traditional female stereotypical role” and men working at their white-collar professions. Another study, in which White, S.E., & Fuentez, T. (“Analysis of Black images in comic strips, 1915-1995.” 1997, Newspaper Research Journal), sampled comics every 10 years for an 80-year period, came to the conclusion that the minorities stereotypical images decreased, but still underrepresented compared to the white characters.

Corpus and method:
My corpus consists of all comic strips, black & white and color, that appear in The Dallas Morning News in the May 24, 2006 issue. The methods used in my research are quantitative and qualitative content analysis. Each character was coded through three wide categories, just like in the previous study: demographics, activities and behavioral characteristics.

Findings:
Out of The Dallas Morning News, I took a sample of 42 comic strips. A little bit over 80% of the bylines were of identifiable male names. There was only one comic strip that contained a cast of characters that were African American; this result would’ve altered if The Boondocks comic strip wasn’t on a six month sabbatical. The male characters outnumbered the 30 female characters. The female characters were shown as doing leisure work, not facing forward, clueless, unable to handle work and stress. Male characters were depicted as providers, all-knowing, and more talking roles. Women were more passive aggressive and nagging, while men more physically violent. Curtis, the only African American comic, portrayed blacks as lazy and liars.

Conclusions:
While Cathy and Sally Forth show some progressive movements towards female independence, my research proves that women are still stuck in the same stereotypical roles as well as racial minorities. This result makes me consider the questions, if there were more female writers and cartoonists, would characters still be predominantly male? And, if that was the case, would the women depict themselves as caretakers and verbally aggressive? A larger study of comics could be done in all the different regions to see if this is a pattern, or if it would alter somehow. It’d be interesting to find out the race of all the writers and cartoonists, as well, because I wonder if diversity is an issue with them.

Monday, May 22, 2006

weird ramblings from my perspective

I never realized that face-ism occurs on magazine covers. But going to the magazine stand and looking at the variety of magazines and noticing the depiction of womens' bodies and mens' head shots happens in almost all magazines. I thought it was humorous that the debate about "women asking to be objectified" came about and how women gossip and talking about people behind their backs and he continued to claim that men don't do that. I don't know, coming from a girl that mainly hangs out with guys, gossip is pretty much all they do, more so than the girls that I hang out with.
I really enjoyed the chapters that I read from the book, Sex in Consumer Culture, so far. More specifically, the chapter about sex in music video. When I wake up in the morning, I like to listen to music so I'll turn on the tele and listen to whatever is on MTV or VH1 while getting ready for the day. Well, this morning, I actually sat down in front of the tele and watched the videos and I must say, sex is definitely a criteria for these video. Not jumping too heavily on stereotypes, but a good indication that it's a rap video, there are women with a heavier bottom half shaking it in front of the cameras. Christina, Britney and Jessica Simpson fall into the category of using their sexual appeal to selling more records. Jessica Simpson's father is her manager and "he had to dress Jessica in skimpy clothes and turn her marriage into a reality television show."- ABC News

Tuesday, May 16, 2006

Jessica VS. Shoshanna

Both women enter the ring, cold stares among their faces, the boxing gloves are on.
Google images: Jessica-2,280 Shoshanna-55
Yahoo images: Jessica-6,849 Shoshanna-41 (at least 5 of these pictures are really of Jessica)

The winner because she was a young, blonde, white girl?
Why did the media pick Lynch to be on the cover of TIME magazine? Oh, because she was the first woman POW. Shoshanna was only the first black woman POW. No significance, huh. Please tell a fake story about the Iraqi doctors mistreating her and let's say she got raped, too. Yeah, that sounds like a great book and TV movie. Forget about the woman who had gun shot wounds around her ankles. That's not good press. No one cares.
I really don't understand our obsession for blonde white girls.


"Iraqi doctors at the hospital in question claimed Lynch was well cared for by hospital personnel and virtually unguarded at the time that she was rescued by American forces; rather, Lynch's "rescue" was a publicity stunt that was staged, and the subsequent news reports were carefully controlled propaganda." -Wikipedia
"Controversy also arose regarding the varying treatment and media coverage of Lynch and Shoshanna Johnson, an African-American soldier captured in the same ambush as Lynch, but rescued later. Critics, including Rev. Jesse Jackson, contended that Johnson's race was a major reason that Johnson received little media attention and a smaller disability pension as compared to Lynch." -Wikipedia

The thoughts of a lil' latina girl


The discussion about TV broadcasting more crimes with African Americans than Whites. Very true. It's the entertainment value. They broadcast crimes with African Americans more, I believe, because they want to install some fear of different races. Let's be honest here, the people who solely watch the news about this subject turn out to be the closed-minded people. Also, when I read the newspaper, I'm bombarded with "white-collar" crimes on the front cover and inside the paper are the reported crimes. So, it seems to me like the television portrays Blacks as the negative and the newspaper portrays Whites as the negative.
Photos of the missing teen, Natalee Holloway, make me think of this angelic, petite, blonde hair, blue-eyed girl. She was the all-American girl; she combined smarts with beauty. The media kept on repeating the fact that she was a Southern girl and known to be friendly.